battis.net and I'm all out of bubble gum…

So many of these entries are really just an attempt to make sure that the next time I go searching for an answer to some question, by gum there will be a search result. That is: I write up things that I couldn’t find an easy answer to, so that someone else reaps the benefit of my suffering.

But, sometimes, it’s just about admitting that I’m dumb.

Case in point: I’ve been grousing on Twitter about a number of things in the past week, one of which was that, for much of the fall, many of my Google calendars have been showing up in iCal doubled. Every event shows up twice. Sometimes more than that, when Google has a hiccup. And birthdays from my contacts have shown up as many as 34 times — no joke: I counted. But the core problem has been that I’ve been seeing many of my Google calendars twice in iCal. It makes me feel busy, but otherwise it serves no purpose.

And then it hit me this evening, as I was looking at the list of calendars in iCal: with the launch of Mountain Lion, Apple revised how it handled Mail, Contacts & Calendars — so much so, in fact, that they created a separate prefpane for it. That connects to iCal, Mail and the Address Book pretty transparently. Before that upgrade, to see secondary Google calendars (the ones other than your primary calendar — a distinction about which I have some more grousing to do at a later date), you had to enable calendar delegates in the Accounts section of the iCal preferences. It was messy, and ugly (you had both the delegate and the calendar nested in the delegate… for each and every calendar). But it worked.

I never turned off the delegates when Apple upgraded to Mail, Contacts & Calendars. So I was seeing both the delegate calendar and the calendar associated with my Google account in Mail, Contacts & Calendars.

For dumb.

I just turned off delegates and everything got better. Except maybe those duplicated birthdays… we’ll see what happens with them.

December 9th, 2012

Posted In: How To

Tags: , , , , ,

As noted earlier, there is a slick trick for taking a publicly accessible calendar in FirstClass and generating an iCalendar feed. Also noted earlier, the big problem with this feed is that it doesn’t contain timezone information, which makes some calendar systems (most notably Google Calendar) assume that everything is happening at Greenwich Mean Time. Which it usually isn’t. And I have written a PHP script that adds Pacific Timezone information to the iCalendar feed.

Let’s put all this together and take a current FirstClass calendar, make it readable from the web, feed it through the script and then add the result to your calendar program of choice.

  1. Right-click (or control-click, on a Mac) on the calendar in question and Add to Desktop. A second calendar icon will appear, possibly named with the name of whoever’s calendar it is. Possibly not. FirstClass is a mystery.
  2. Drag the new calendar into your Web Publishing folder (on some versions, Web Publishing may be called Home Page Folder — why is this? FirstClass is a mystery.)
  3. At this point you’re faced with a choice: either blithely disregard security, rely on security through obscurity, or be ready to generate a somewhat more aggravating URL to be more (but still not fully) secure.
    1. Disregard security: leave the calendar named whatever it’s currently named. You need to change the permissions (right-click/control-click and choose Permissions) so that All Users has Schedule+Details permissions on the calendar. This will change permissions for not just the copy in the Web Publishing folder, but also for the original calendar — since the “copy” in Web Publishing is just an alias to the original anyway.
    2. Security through obscurity: rename the calendar something else (I usually do this, and use a password generating application to give me a random collection of letters and numbers — e.g. a2612GhxU). Change permissions as described in 3(a) above.
    3. Better security: follow the directions here for generating your URL. Don’t tinker with permissions.
  4. Point a web browser at calendar in your Web Publishing folder, add the iCalendar feed get parameters, and copy that new URL to the clipboard.
  5. Point your web browser your copy of the time zone script and paste the URL you just copied into the Calendar URL field and click Generate.
  6. Copy the new URL that appears below. You can paste that URL into whatever calendaring system you want (that can subscribe to iCalendar feeds).
    1. In Google Calendar, you would Add a new calendar by URL and paste in your URL. (caveat: Google doesn’t seem to be too fantastic about actually updating iCalendar feeds — they allege that this is a sporadic issue, but I have experienced it as more prevalent than sporadic).
    2. In iCal, you would choose Subscribe… from the Calendar menu and paste in your URL.
    3. You could also paste this URL (via some contortions — e.g. email it to yourself and copy-paste from that) into a phone calendar app.

June 14th, 2011

Posted In: How To

Tags: , , , , , ,

css.php