battis.net and I'm all out of bubble gum…

So… the RSS embed plugin for our school wiki server has been broken since before school started, with no sign of a fix in sight (other things are taking higher priority). Of course, since I have zero desire to post each new training video to our school video as I make them, this is a bit of a stumbling block. But…

I slapped together a script that makes use of the Magpie RSS framework to render some (most?) RSS feeds as a simple HTML page, which I can then embed as an IFRAME in our school wiki. Et voilá, no more having to paste in individual links! You can give it a whirl yourself: paste an RSS feed into this form:

RSS feed:

Obviously, if you have need of this on a regular basis, I would be happy to share the code — don’t just run it off my poor little web server!

November 22nd, 2010

Posted In: How To

Tags: , , ,

So, I’ve spent the last few days wrestling with a curriculum unit that an outside consultant built. In PowerPoint. On Windows. And which we have been trying to set up in such a way that we can share the interactive document with students. Who are using Macs. And, perhaps, without asking each student to download a ~200MB file to use it.

I have learned and grown much in the process. And have discovered that Microsoft PowerPoint 2008 does an execrable job of exporting PowerPoints as web pages (it does an execrable job of doing a lot of other things too, but we can talk about that at another time). Here are the key fixes that I made to the exported web page and supporting files so that the presentation would fundamentally work (all of this was done using regular expressions in TextMate):

  1. I stripped out all of the fancy Javascript calls that PowerPoint inserted as links to navigate from one slide to another. It turns out that a simple HREF to the actual page’s HTML file works (and the JavaScript Does Not.)
    Find:

    (href=")[^"]*(slide\d{4,4}.htm)[^"]*(")

    Replace with:

    $1$2$3
  2. The export to web page takes all of the already URL-encoded links in the PowerPoint and reencodes them, rendering them useless. I stripped off the second encoding.
    Find:

    (%)25([a-fA-F0-9]{2,2})

    Replace with:

    $1$2
  3. Finally, because the links were built in Windows and then URL-encoded, all of the Windows-style paths needed to be turned into POSIX paths for use on the web.
    Find:

    %5[cC]

    Replace with:

    /

At this point, in an average PowerPoint, most of the damage has been fixed and things more or less work. However, the curriculum unit that we were working with also linked to external Word documents (hence some of the Windows-style path issues above). This meant I had a few more fixes along the way that are worthy of note:

  1. I replaced the links to Word documents with links to the corresponding PDF files (and script I used generated PDF files with .doc.pdf extensions and I didn’t bother to fix that).
    Find:

    (href="[^"]*docx?)(")

    Replace with:

    $1.pdf$2
  2. These links to external documents open in the same frame as the slideshow. Which defeats the purpose of the slideshow being a navigational tool. So I redirected all of the new PDF links to a new window in the browser. As the hyperlinks are broken across two lines in the HTML source code, this took two steps.
    1. Find (changing {{name of Links & Sources folder}} to the, well, actual name of the Links & Sources folder):
      (href="((http://)|({{name of Links & Sources folder}}))[^"]*")\n

      Replace with:

      $1
    2. Find (modifying as noted above):
      (href="((http://)|({{name of Links & Sources folder}}))[^"]*"\starget=")_top(")

      Replace with:

      $1_blank$5

September 24th, 2009

Posted In: Educational Technology, How To

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

css.php