battis.net and I'm all out of bubble gum…

So, my students in Advanced CS are working on their second semester projects. One project group is working on mastering Unity to build an iPhone game, and they just spent several days struggling with getting Unity Remote to work with their iPhones.

After much Googling and exasperation, they figured out the answer (which was not, prior to this post.

They had been able to see the iPhone in the Unity editor. They had been able to set up the remote to use the iPhone in the Unity editor in project settings. But when they “played” their game in the editor, it just sat there inertly, waiting for a connection. Consternation. Rending of garments. So forth and so on.

The trick, it turns out, is that when one installs the Unity editor, one must install iOS development support. Not a shocker. But certainly worth mentioning in an error message somewhere.

March 11th, 2016

Posted In: How To

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One of my colleagues, Matt Zipin (in fact, my high school computer science teacher), just sent me a link to an iPhone app that his current student, Ari Weinstein put together. It was one of those rare moments of seeing a piece of software and thinking, “This… this is exactly what I have been looking for! It’s almost like they had me in mind when they wrote it!”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, I had this reaction because, in fact, Ari has written an application that I suggested. Based on my work at St. Grottlesex as a Thirds’ basketball coach. I had been running practices using the timer and counter apps separately on my iPhone. Which was workable. But unwieldy. Enter.. Ari’s Basketball Timer app, which elegantly and cleanly combines these two tools into a single screen.

I think my favorite part of the app is something that you can’t see, that you can only experience: starting the Time out Timer stops the main clock, and starting the main clock stops the Time out Timer. How simple. How elegant. How easy it would have been to skip over.

Thank you Ari and Matt!

April 27th, 2011

Posted In: Computer Science

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I actually really, really want to document some of our projects that we’re working on this year in a great deal more detail. But, for now, I am simply publishing my notes from a conversation that I just had with Apple Education about the legalities of having high school students develop for the app store.

So… I just got off the phone with Apple Education (they were following up on an iOS in Education event a few months ago that I had actually missed). But: I did get the straight dope on Apple Developer accounts and high schools:
  • University accounts are just that: for higher education. Non-negotiable.
  • There are really three levels of developer that are pertinent to high school:
    • Free — they can download Xcode and use the iPhone simulator.
    • Individual ($99) — Same as free, plus they can use their iPhones/iPads to debug the software live (with the right certificates — I’ve found that the easiest way to set up the certificates is directly through the Xcode Organizer). My recollection is that they can have up to something like 100 devices for “debugging.” At this level, they can post apps to the App Store.
    • Enterprise ($299, IIRC) — Individual, plus the ability to manage a fleet of iOS devices (remote install and remote wipe), as well as distributing their software internally with no restrictions. I actually pressed him pretty hard on this, and he wasn’t 100% (“read the language in the agreement first”), but he thinks that it would be viable for the school to buy an Enterprise license and then say “Come by the computer lab and we’ll install our cool in-house app on your iPhone for free.” (Or for money — I don’t think they care.)
  • Apple strongly discourages the school (which would, in reality, be a single individual) signing up for an Individual developer account as the primary distribution channel to the App store for student apps. The rationale being that if a particular app makes it big, the individual who has control of that account well, has control of that account. Apple deals with account holders, not the model that the school constructed. They suggested that if a group of students wanted to band together on an app, that they should sign up as a group for an Individual account through which to distribute that app — and that they should draw up their own contract on their end for how to manage that account.
  • Students under 18 need to be signed up for the account by their parents. (Contract law — the kids are underage.)
At the end of the day, it sounded like my approach this year is basically right on the nose: I have an Individual account in my name that I use to install apps on test iPhones (and I have registered all the student iPhones as debugging devices). The students signed up for free accounts at the beginning of the year. I think what we’ll do when we release this app is sign up for a new Individual account that the students will jointly share to post the app to the App Store (something like “[Jewish Day School] App Design ’10’-’11”).

February 15th, 2011

Posted In: Computer Science, Uncategorized

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